Arielle and Archer Holley and Elayne at the Chattanooga Choo Choo

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Southern Architecture:  Tour an 1894 Queen Anne Mansion on Missionary Ridge

Southern Architecture: Tour an 1894 Queen Anne Mansion on Missionary Ridge

The National Register of Historic Places Hutcheson House in Chattanooga, TN

Historic Missionary Ridge sits high above and looks down on the sprawling City of Chattanooga.  It played a very important part in the Civil War and homes were being developed here as early as 1880.  At one time, it was a city unto itself, home to the wealthy industrialists of the time, with its own Mayor, schools, churches and transportation.

 Missionary Ridge view from Cameron Hill

Missionary Ridge view from Cameron Hill

By 1887, private individuals developed a streetcar system to enable ease of access to and from the very high ridge with spectacular views.  Many of the homes had their own streetcar stop, carefully constructed to match the architecture of the main home. The architect of this marvel was Samual Patton, a relative newcomer to Chattanooga, from Jackson, Mississippi. Although Patton designed many homes in the Chattanooga area, only two remain standing today, Patten Hall and the one and only Hutcheson House.  

 Missionary Ridge Cable Car

Missionary Ridge Cable Car

From the application for the National Register of Historic Places, the home is described as "Stylistically eclectic but has numerous characteristics which are decidedly Chateauesque. Built of brick, with walls eighteen inches thick, the overall plan is asymmetrical. The high hip roof has tile shingles, delicate cresting, and hipped dormers. Most of the trim, including sash and transom sills, lintels, and the truncated Richardsonian porch columns, are gray stone, which sharply contrasts with the dark red brick.

The house features three wall dormers topped with decorative parapets; the conically roofed turret has a similar parapet. The rear of the house has two bay windows, one of which is round and the other polygonal. The use of continuous sills enhances the horizontal lines of the building while the turret, tall chimney stacks, and wall dormers emphasize its height. The L-shaped-arcade, with its Romanesque arches,.contributes to the massive appearance of the house. Sash and transom, round-arch, and multi-light windows provide a various fenestration which further stresses the complexity of the Hutcheson House.

The mansion has three stories plus an attic and full basement for a total of 26 rooms and 14,000 square feet of floor space. As originally built, there were no closets, only one bathroom, a roller skating rink on the third floor, oak paneling, and eleven fireplaces. Despite the amount of floor space and high ceilings, the rooms are cozy and comfortable.

The Hutcheson House (Windcrest) stands on the crest of a hill on the ridge surrounded by mature trees and manicured grounds, and a random rubble rock wall encircles the property. The original carriage house and smokehouse still remain. The former is a most unusual structure. A two-and-a-half story, square, brick structure, the roof has a total of six dormers and a tower. The first and third levels are used for work and storage space, respectively, and the main or second level for parking automobiles; a particularly curious feature of this floor is that it has a round-arch and a square-arch opening."

 Street View

Street View

 Side view of Hutcheson House

Side view of Hutcheson House

 View of the accompanying Lawn and part of 2.2 Acres of Prime Land

View of the accompanying Lawn and part of 2.2 Acres of Prime Land

 Statuary Guarding the Entryway

Statuary Guarding the Entryway

 Entryway/Receiving Room

Entryway/Receiving Room

 The Sitting Room

The Sitting Room

 Stair Landing Sitting Area

Stair Landing Sitting Area

 The Library

The Library

 Second Floor Stair Landing Sitting Room

Second Floor Stair Landing Sitting Room

 The Formal Dining Room

The Formal Dining Room

 The Master Bedroom

The Master Bedroom

 The Kitchen

The Kitchen

 The Breakfast Room

The Breakfast Room

 The Sunroom

The Sunroom

This one of a kind home has over 10,000 square feet, 7 bedrooms, 5 and 1/2 baths, 8 fireplaces, 6 living rooms, a pool, pool house and carriage house to name just a few highlights. The home was recently sold to the third owners to have been so lucky to experience the beauty and history of this unique and wonderful property since it was completed in 1894. Missionary Ridge and The Hutcheson House are truly two of the most beautiful National historic treasures in the South.

I hope you enjoyed the tour through this magnificent piece of Southern Architecture.  What are some of your favorite places on the National Register?  Share them with me; I can't wait to hear from everyone!

Until next time...Godspeed!

House Tour:  The Hutcheson House Chattanooga TN Missionary Ridge National Register of Historic Places
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